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Glossary

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M
Abbreviation for a quantity of 1000. See M weight.

"M" WEIGHT
Weight of 1000 sheets of paper at a given size and basis weight. Is defined as the weight in pounds of 1000 sheets of paper of a given basis weight and size (dimensions); M is the Roman numeral for 1000.

MACHINE CLOTHING
See clothing.

MACHINE COATED
Applying coating to paper on the paper machine on which the paper is made. Paper which is coated on one or two sides, on the paper machine. See conversion coated.

MACHINE DIRECTION
The direction from the wet end to the dry end of a paper machine or to a paper sheet parallel to its forward movement on a paper machine. Also referred to as grain direction or long direction. See grain direction.

MACHINE FINISH
A smooth surface obtained by calendering on a paper machine. Example 50 lb., 600 ppi. This paper is smoother than Eggshell but not as smooth as English Finish. The finish applied on the paper machine.

MACHINE GLAZED (MG)
Paper with a high-gloss surface finish produced on the wire side of a sheet by passing it over a roll as used on yankee-type paper machine dryers.

MACHINE MADE PAPER
Paper made on a very rapid running machine called a "Fourdrinier," producing consistent quantities of sheets or rolls.

MAGENTA
See process colors.

MAKE AND HOLD
A given quantity of paper which is made on order and held by the manufacturer awaiting customer shipping instructions.

MAKEREADY
Adjusting feeders, grippers, guides, blanket pressure, hanging plates and adding ink to the fountain prior to running a job on press. make-ready On a printing press, all work done prior to running, i.e., adjusting grippers and guides, putting ink in the fountain, mounting plates, obtaining proper ink flow through he press to the paper, etc. Press make-ready is to be distinguished from job make-ready which also includes the paper and time to achieve register and color.

MANIFOLD FORM
A multi-part (multi-ply) business form normally made with carbonless paper or "forms bond" interleaved with carbon paper or tissue. Usually made with light weight, dense paper for transmitting the imaging energy down thru the plies of the form.

MAP PAPER
1) Any paper used for map printing. Map papers are generally made in basis weights ranging from 16 to 28 pounds (17x22-500) or 40 to 70 pounds (25x38-500) and may have special qualities such as wet strength, water repellency, mildew resistance, abrasion resistance, and luminescence.
2) An offset printing paper made from chemical wood pulp and designed especially for road maps, atlases, etc.

MASTER
See paper plates.

MATTE FINISH
A coated paper with a low level of gloss compared to enamel or gloss finishes. The non-glossy appearance resulting from being an uncoated sheet of paper, or from coating without super calendering; the least glossy paper surfaces available. See gloss.

Mechanical
See paste-up.

MECHANICAL CARBONLESS
See spot carbonizing.

MECHANICAL GHOSTING
See ghosting.

MECHANICAL PULP
Groundwood pulp produced by grinding logs against stones or disc. This pulp contains lignin, which tends to fade and discolor in time. Example: Newsprint. See groundwood; also see semi-chemical, thermo-mechanical, and refiner mechanical pulp (RMP).

MERCHANT
A company designated by a paper mill to represent and distribute their products and services to printers and publishers.

METRIC SYSTEM
A decimal system used by most countries other than the U.S., for solid, liquid and distance measurements; See basis weight and grammage.

MICROCAPSULES
See microencapsulation.

MICROENCAPSULATION
The process of producing microcapsules, microscopic sized "packages," for controlled release. The process was an invention for, and is still used in the production of, carbonless paper, but has found widespread application, including use in pharmaceuticals and agriculture.

MICROMETER
A device for accurately measuring the thickness (caliper) of paper.

MICR
Magnetic Ink Character Recognition/ Reading; magnetic inks printed on business documents, like checks, so as to be easily readable by the data processing machines through which the forms are run.

MILKING
Also called whitening; the gradual buildup of coating or filler material (usually white pigments, thus the names) from the paper on the non-image areas of the blanket. Over time this can be abrasive to the lithographic plate, and can sensitize the non-image areas of the plate resulting in scumming. Milking can result from the softening of a coated paper surface by the first printing unit(s) fountain solution, and only be evidenced in the later or last printing unit. Whitening (dusting) is usually evidenced in the first printing units, as the result of loose pigment coming off or out of the sheet surface. If either milking or whitening is severe enough, a buildup of the white material in the non-image area can be termed "piling."

MIL
See caliper.

MIMEOGRAPH PRINTING
A form of screen printing, using the porous principle; a stencil is "cut" (usually with an impact typewriter) to create porous image areas in the screen. This then allows an ink to be forced through these porous areas onto the sheet of paper brought into contact with the stencil; the paper used has a toothy, absorbent surface.

MINERAL OIL
Petrochemical oil that can be used as a part of the ink vehicle. A common branded series of mineral oils are called Magie Oils.

MISTING
A mist or fog of tiny liquid droplets thrown off a coater (coating) or printing press (ink) by high speed rotating parts.

MOIRE PATTERN
In process color printing, the undesirable patterns that are caused by incorrect screen angles of successive colors. See rosette pattern.

MOISTURE
The percentage of moisture in pulp, paper, etc. that varies according to atmospheric conditions. Moisture content of paper is normally measured by drying the paper to constant weight at 100 degrees C. Paper will normally have about 5% moisture when dry, but that value can range from 3% to 7%, depending on the type of paper and the materials used in its manufacture.

MOISTURE PROOF
Ability of paper and paperboard to resist the penetration of water vapor.

MOISTURE VAPOR TRANSMISSION
A sheet of paper's rate of water vapor penetration.

MOISTURE WELTS
See weather wrinkles.

MOTTLE
The spotty or uneven appearance of printing, mostly in solid areas. Refers to the spotty, uneven or non-uniform appearance of either a printed surface (mostly in solid ink coverage areas), or to a nonuniform distribution of fibers in the formation of a sheet of paper. Also see backtrap mottle.

MOULD MADE PAPER
Paper made by a slowly rotating machine called a cylinder mould that simulates the hand-papermaking process. Fibers become more randomly intertwined than in machine made papers, producing a stronger, more flexible sheet or roll.

MSST
Manufacturing Standards & Specifications for Textbooks (NASTA & BMI).

MULLEN
Resistance of paper to rupture when pressure is applied to a side by a specified instrument.

MULLEN TESTER
A machine for testing the bursting strength of paper. Also pop test; equipment which tests bursting strength of paper, the force necessary to punch a hole in paper.

MULTI-COLOR
In printing, a job requiring the use of two or more ink colors (normally four color process). A printing press which can print two or more colors on paper in one pass through the press.

MULTI-PACK ROLLS
A term referring to packaging two or more rolls together.

MULTI-PLY
A paper or paperboard sheet made up of two or more layers.


 
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